Military History

Military History

The Six Day War

Dear Editors,

I am a subscriber of your magazine Military Heritage. Recently, I have noticed that the tremendous, extraordinary battles and strategies of WWII have at best received minimal coverage. Read more

Military History

Plevna Under Seige

By Victor Kamenir

By the late 1870s, Turkey, the so-called “Sick Man of Europe,” was in terminal decline. While Sultan Abdul Hamid sequestered himself in his palatial compound through paranoid fear of an assassination, the Ottoman Empire was tearing itself apart. Read more

Military History

The Weight of a Sword

Dear Editor:

First, let me congratulate you on a great magazine; I love history, especially medieval history, and Military Heritage rarely fails to have much of interest. Read more

Military History

Guns at Bear Paw

Dear Editor:

In an excellent Military Heritage (December 2003) article about the Gatling gun, A.B. Feuer indicates that a Gatling gun was used at the Battle of the Bear Paw from September 30-October 5, 1877. Read more

Military History

Surigao Strait Witness

Dear Sir:

Your story in the December 2003 issue was of special interest to me as I was a witness to a part of the event. Read more

Military History

Armenians at Antioch

Dear Editor:

In your August 2003 issue John Murphy in an article titled “Deus le Veult!” discussed one of the most fascinating military operations in the history of the Crusades—the conquest of Antioch. Read more

Military History

Barbarian Horror

Dear Editor,

The article, “Warrior Queen’s Revenge” in your August 2003 edition contains a supposition by the author that I question. Read more

Military History

A Wholesale Rout Began

Correction

In our June 2002 story about Napoleon’s campaign in Italy, we misidentified the credit for the illustration on page 33. Read more

Military History

The fallen … and the living.

At a time long ago, and in a place far away, a man stood up before his countrymen to console them if he could for the loss of their sons in battle for a righteous cause. Read more

A crowned Duke William II of Normandy discovers the Saxon King Harold lying dead on the battlefield in this Victorian painting of the Battle of Hastings by Frank Wilkin. The actual encounter was some six miles from Hastings, at Senlac Hill, near the present-day town of Battle, East Sussex.

Military History

William, Duke of Normandy

By Mark Carlson

The final defeat of the Saxon King Harold at the Battle of Hastings on October 14, 1066, meant that England became forever Norman. Read more

Military History

Horatio Nelson: Deserving Hero

Days before the impending battle of Trafalgar, a sailor on Horatio Nelson’s flagship Victory was so busy ensuring that each man’s letters home were secured for dispatch on a vessel bound for England that he forgot until after the ship had sailed that he hadn’t included his own. Read more

An M-26 tank—manned by soldiers of the 9th Infantry Regiment—is poised to counter an enemy attempt to cross the Naktong River in Korea, September 1950.

Military History

“Bulldog Johnny” Walker

By Blaine Taylor

In September 1948, Lt. Gen. Walton Harris Walker, 58, took over command of the Eighth Army on occupation duty in Japan from his predecessor, Robert Eichelberger, a former West Point superintendent and devotee of Allied Supreme Commander General Douglas MacArthur. Read more

Created solely from the artist’s imagination, this chromolithograph was issued to meet the Ameri- can public’s demand for revenge against Spain for the destruction of the USS Maine.

Military History

The USS Maine

By VanLoan Naisawald

Darkness had settled over the harbor, the lights along the shoreline casting a faint glow on the murky harbor water. Read more

Military History

Greek Fire

By Robert Heege

The year was ad 678, 46 years after the death of the prophet Mohammed. Now the Mohammedans, determined to bring the light of Islam to Arabia and beyond, were streaking across the whole of the Middle East like a comet. Read more

Military History

Desperate Fight on the Plains

By Eric Niderost

In June 24, 1867, W.W. Wright’s survey expedition reached Fort Wallace, Kans., one of the string of military posts that guarded the Smoky Hill Trail to Denver and the beckoning goldfields of Colorado. Read more