J.E.B. Stuart

General J.E.B. Stuart was commander of the Cavalry Corps of General Robert E. Lee’s Confederate Army of Northern Virginia for much of the Civil War.  J.E.B. Stuart was superb in the role, providing the army with valuable reconnaissance as its eyes and ears, while deftly supporting battlefield operations. J.E.B. Stuart was the ideal of the “cavalier,” dashing in full uniform with a rakish plumed hat.  Stuart’s reputation, however, was tarnished during the Gettysburg Campaign, in which he lost contact with General Lee for several crucial days.  Stuart was mortally wounded at the Battle of Yellow Tavern and died at the age of 31 on May 12, 1864.

J.E.B. Stuart

Stalemate at Seven Pines

By David Norris

On the last day of May 1862, heavy gunfire rumbled and thundered in the distance beyond the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia. Read more

J.E.B. Stuart

Battle of Mechanicsville: McClellan’s Unexploited Victory

By John Walker

After an almost uninterrupted, four-month-long string of Union successes beginning in early 1862, followed by the advance of a 100,000-man enemy army to the eastern outskirts of its capital at Richmond, Virginia, the Confederacy suddenly found itself in a life-or-death struggle for its very survival. Read more

J.E.B. Stuart

Battle of Antietam: Clash in the Cornfield

By Michael E. Haskew

The White House was a somber place in the summer of 1862. The Civil War was in the midst of its second costly year, and the Union armies had yet to win a significant victory in the eastern theater. Read more

J.E.B. Stuart

Battle of Gettysburg: No Picnic at Culp’s Hill

By Roy Morris Jr.

As they formed ranks on the Hanover Road one mile east of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on the afternoon of July 2, 1863, the men in the II Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia stared anxiously at the giant boulders and towering oak trees dotting the humpbacked prominence known as Culp’s Hill, three quarters of a mile southeast of town. Read more