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Going Up Against J.E.B. Stuart

Brigadier General Alfred Pleasonton’s outward appearance was that of a well-groomed man. He kept his beard and moustache neatly trimmed, parted his wavy hair on the side, and wore a wide-brimmed hat like a dandy. Read more

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American Isolation Advocates

By Al Hemingway

As war clouds loomed over Europe prior to Germany’s invasion of Poland on September 1, 1939, many Americans were divided into two camps—isolationists or interventionists. Read more

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A ghost of the Battle of Britain rises from the English Channel.

The slender fuselage of the Dornier Do-17 engendered the German bomber’s distinctive nickname of the “flying pencil.” In the summer of 1940, the Do-17 was an integral component of the Luftwaffe air armada that struck British military installations and cities in the vain effort to bring the island nation to its knees. Read more

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Tragedy and Triumph

By Christopher Miskimon

On January 21, 1945, Lt. Col. Felix Sparks looked out over the rough, hilly terrain of the Vosges Mountains near Reipertswiller, France. Read more

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World of Warplanes

By Joseph Luster

Less than a month prior to the time of this writing, the open beta for World of Warplanes officially kicked off. Read more

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Company of Heroes 2

By Joseph Luster

Relic Entertainment originally knocked real-time strategy out of the park in 2006 with the original Company of Heroes. Read more

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Sniper Elite: Nazi Zombie Army

By Joseph Luster

Sniper Elite V2—which remade Rebellion Developments’ 2005 original—enjoyed a decent reception when it launched across a variety of platforms, including PC, PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360, throughout 2012, with a Wii U release that should be hitting shelves shortly. Read more

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Fallujah Awakens

The Iraq War is now considered a closed chapter in U.S. history but the true lessons are only now beginning to be drawn. Read more

The exterior of Istanbul’s military museum, the Askeri Müze.

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Istanbul Naval Museum and Istanbul Military Museum

By Peter Suciu

Modern-day Turkey is truly a land of east meets west, and within the cosmopolitan city are two of the country’s finest military museums, the Istanbul Naval Museum (Istanbul Deniz Müzesi), which was established in 1897 and includes notable artifacts pertaining to the Ottoman Navy, and the Istanbul Military Museum (Askerî Müze), which is dedicated to more than a thousand years of Turkish military history. Read more

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The Song of the Nibelungs

When the Huns swept through the plains of northern Europe in spring 451 on their way to what would become one of the decisive battles of Late Antiquity, the Frankish peoples could do little to resist the swarming bands of horsemen who showed no mercy to anyone in their path. Read more

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Winter 2013 WWII Games

By Joseph Luster

We’re dialing things back a few years this time around by diving into Sid Meier’s Ace Patrol, which puts World War I dogfighting in the palm of your hands on the iOS device of your choosing. Read more

A flight of Supermarine Spitfire fighters is a breathtaking sight in the sky above Europe. The Spitfire received tremendous credit for defeating the Luftwaffe during the Battle of Britain.

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Deadly Thoroughbred Unleashed

By Michael D. Hull

Fast, graceful, and deadly, the British Supermarine Spitfire was one of the most recognizable and famous fighter planes of World War II. Read more

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Summer 2013 Military Games

By Joseph Luster

To be properly excited for the upcoming release of ARMA Tactics, created by the folks at Bohemia Interactive, it helps to also be a little pumped for NVIDIA’s Android-based Project Shield handheld. Read more

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Petraeus’ COIN Strategy

By Al Hemingway

Hard-charging and charismatic, U.S. Army General David Petraeus, together with a cadre of subordinates, attempted to rewrite the methods used by the military to wage future wars. Read more

With cattle, children, and all the possessions they could cram into their wagons, civilians escape from the approaching German invaders near Leningrad, July 1941. Over 16 million Soviet citizens became refugees—probably the largest mass migration in history.

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Escape To Tashkent

By Rebecca Manley

In the fall of 1941, the Polish writer Aleksander Wat, recently released from confinement in a Soviet prison, made his way east across the vast expanses of the Soviet Union. Read more

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Discovery in the depths of Lake Garda.

Sixty-seven years after it sank in the depths of Lake Garda in northeastern Italy on the stormy night of April 30, 1945, an American amphibious vehicle, a 2.5-ton DUKW, has likely been located sitting upright in 905 feet of water. Read more

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The Search for the Missing DUKW of Lake Garda

It was April 29, 1945. World War II was nearly over. Former Italian Fascist leader Benito Mussolini was dead, killed by partisans at Lake Como on April 28, and his body mutilated and strung up in a Milan gas station. Read more