In December 1943, the First Canadian Infantry Division was ordered to capture the Italian port  town of Ortona.

Canada

Little Stalingrad: The Struggle for Ortona

By Jerome Baldwin

By the autumn of 1943, the Allied armies fighting in Italy had discovered that Winston Churchill’s description of Italy as the “soft underbelly of Europe” had been a falsehood of monumental proportions. Read more

The American-built Sherman medium tank was admittedly inferior to its German opponents. Yet, it won the war in Northwest Europe through shear numbers.

Canada

M4 Sherman: “Blunder” or “Wonder” Weapon?

By Blaine Taylor

For the Allied tankers and infantrymen of the American, British, Canadian, and Free French armies battling German Panther and Tiger tanks in Normandy in the summer of 1944, the Sherman tank’s failures were glaringly evident as their own shells bounced off the hulls of the Nazi armor and they were themselves destroyed at a far greater range by the powerful German tanks. Read more

Canada

The Troublesome Ross Rifle of WWI

At the turn of the 20th century, Canada was dependent on Great Britain for rifles to equip her army. In 1901, however, a request by the Canadian government to purchase 15,000 Lee-Enfield Mark I rifles from Britain was denied. Read more

Canada

The Canadian Military Heritage Museum

By Jerome Baldwin

The Canadian Military Heritage Museum in Brantford, Ontario, has a four-part mission: to collect, preserve, and display artifacts pertaining to the military history of Canada; to maintain and manage a museum for the purpose of education; to display the artifacts at community events; and to honor the fallen and all veterans who have served and are still serving in the Canadian military. Read more

A long-simmering rebellion by Canadians against British rule in the 1830s almost embroiled the United States into a third war with Great Britain.

Canada

Mackenzie’s Rebellion

By Chuck Lyons

In December 1837, 400 men armed with muskets, pitchforks, and staves marched against the city of Toronto and the British government. Read more

Andrew Jackson and his hard-bitten Tennessee militia would inflict a deadly retribution at Horseshoe Bend.

Canada

Reckoning at Horseshoe Bend

By Christopher G. Marquis

In the late summer of 1813, some 550 men, women, and children took refuge within a small wilderness outpost and waited for the worst. Read more

After the disastrous failure of operation market garden, the allies were determined to open the german held Belgian port on the Scheldt Estuary.

Canada

Battle of the Scheldt Estuary

By Allyn Vannoy

As the Allied armies advanced across Western Europe in the summer of 1944, the First Canadian Army undertook the task of clearing the coastal areas and opening the Channel ports. Read more

United Nations forces fought a series of bloody battles with Chinese and Korean Communists for a piece of strategic real estate known as “the Hook.”

Canada

Fighting for the Hook

By Al Hemingway

Peering intently through a telescope, General Lemuel C. Shepherd, the commandant of the Marine Corps, scanned the shell-pocked Korean terrain in front of his position. Read more

An ambitious plan to invade Canada and bring it into the American fold floundered on the steep slopes above the Niagara River.

Canada

Disaster at Queenston Heights

By Chuck Lyons

In June 1812, the United States, provoked by arrogant British actions on the high seas and its support of hostile Indians in the Northwest Territories, declared war on Great Britain and immediately began planning an invasion of British-held Canada. Read more

Canada

To Watch the Weather

By Marty Morgan

Throughout World War II the Allies enjoyed a certain advantage over the Axis that was purely the product of geography. Read more

Canada

Justus Sherwood: Loyalist Frontiersman

by Mike Phifer

Born in Connecticut in 1747, Justus Sherwood moved west into the rugged New Hampshire Grants (later to become the state of Vermont) in 1766 where he took up trading, surveying and making potash. Read more

The 1758 Battle of Ticonderoga

Canada

The 1758 Battle of Ticonderoga

by John F. Murphy, Jr.

On the morning of July 8, 1758, the largest field army yet gathered by the British Empire in North America stood a mile from a French stone fort in the forests of what was then the colony of New York. Read more