US Marines and their landing craft on the beach during the Battle of Tarawa, a Pacific atoll in the Gilbert Islands (now Kiribati), 20th-23rd November 1943. (Photo by Frederic Lewis/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

United States Marine Corps

WWII Vehicles: The Island-Hopping LVT

By R.J. Seese

While making business calls in Tampa, Florida, during the summer of 1980, I spotted a strange looking tracked contraption atop an overgrown pedestal in front of the U.S. Read more

United States Marine Corps

Guadalcanal: Bloody Encounter at Hell’s Point

by Al Hemingway

On the humid morning of August 19, 1942, infantrymen from Company A, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines carefully eyed the landscape for any signs of Japanese soldiers as they slowly made their way through the thick jungle on the island of Guadalcanal, located in the Solomon Islands. Read more

United States Marine Corps

Coast Watchers in the Solomons

by John Brown

Two weeks after Pearl Harbor, coast watcher Cornelius Page, a plantation manager on Tabar Island 20 miles north of New Ireland in the South Pacific, reported by teleradio that Japanese planes were making reconnaissance flights over New Ireland and New Britain. Read more

United States Marine Corps

Operation Dovetail: Guadalcanal Rehearsal

by Arnold Blumberg

By June 1942, the military might of Imperial Japan threatened Australia. The string of spectacular Japanese conquests in the South Pacific menaced lines of supply and communication between the United States and its allies and bases in the region. Read more

Still a Splendid Sight: Merrill's Mauraders

United States Marine Corps

Still a Splendid Sight: Merrill’s Mauraders

by Al Hemingway

Private First Class Frank Rinaldi cautiously made his way through the dense foliage. He and other soldiers were on patrol when they heard the unmistakable sound of Japanese voices, and they inched their way forward to investigate. Read more

United States Marine Corps

The USS Panay: First Step on the Road to War

by Eric Niderost

Around 10 o’clock on the morning of December 13, 1937, New York Times correspondent Hallett Abend received an unexpected visitor: Rear Admiral Tadao Honda of the Imperial Japanese Navy. Read more