Military Heritage

November 2017

Volume 19, No. 3

Cover: During the Hundred Years’ War, when kings still waged war along side their soldiers, French king John II is shown on foot, bloody sword in hand, shortly before his surrender at Poitiers.
Painting by Graham Turner, akgimages / Osprey Publishing / Poitiers 1356

November 2017

Military Heritage

Bloody Assault on Knoxville

By Mike Phifer

At midnight on November 13, 1863, two companies of the Palmetto (South Carolina) Sharpshooters Regiment led by Captain Alfred Foster slipped down to the south bank of the Tennessee River at Huff’s Ferry. Read more

November 2017

Military Heritage

Death by Longbow at Crecy

By Tim Miller

At the age of 50, John of Bohemia was already old for a warrior and completely blind. He not only was the Count of Luxembourg and King of Bohemia, but also claimant to the thrones of Poland and Hungary. Read more

November 2017

Military Heritage

Patriot Raid on Fort Ticonderoga

By Joshua Shepherd

For General Thomas Gage, 1775 was shaping up to be a disastrous year. Gage, who was the supreme British commander in North America, was headquartered in Boston and tasked with the unenviable job of enforcing a blockade of the town’s harbor. Read more

November 2017

Military Heritage

The Battle of White Mountain, 1620

By William E. Welsh

In the valley south of the hill known in Czech as Bitna Hora, a vast host assembled by the Austrian Hapsburgs advanced toward the ranks of the Protestant rebels blocking the path to Prague, the capital of Bohemia. Read more

November 2017

Military Heritage, Editorial

Holly Springs was Van Dorn’s ticket to fame.

The horsemen charged into the town from the northeast guns blazing and screaming the hair-raising Rebel yell. Yankees wearing their sleepwear struggled to get out of their tents in the dawn attack and then ran for their lives. Read more

November 2017

Military Heritage, Soldiers

Confederate Major General Earl Van Dorn

By William F. Floyd, Jr.

Confederate Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn had a glaring flaw. Although the Mississippi-born general had a son and daughter from his marriage to Caroline Godbold, he committed adultery on multiple occasions. Read more

November 2017

Military Heritage, Weapons

The Lee-Enfield Bolt Action Rifle

By Christopher Miskimon

A small party of about 40 German soldiers had infiltrated the Australian lines around the besieged town of Tobruk, Libya, during the night of April 13, 1941. Read more

November 2017

Military Heritage, Intelligence

Death of Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto

By Phil Zimmer

Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, commander of the combined Fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy, intended to press ahead with his morale-boosting visits to forward units in the South Pacific in April 1943, despite dire warnings from subordinates of possible enemy ambushes. Read more

November 2017

Military Heritage, Books

The French Foreign Legion at Tuyen Quang

By Christopher Miskimon

The Chinese were coming, and the French Foreign Legion WAS preparing to meet them. In January 1885, 390 Legionnaires, backed by a handful of sailors, locally recruited troops, and eight sappers, busily fortified the old Chinese fort at Tuyen Quang. Read more