Keyword:

German

WWI’s Daring Cavalry Charge

WWI’s Daring Cavalry Charge

By Alex Zakrzewski

In late 1917, the most successful cavalry charge of World War I took place not on the muddy killing fields of the Western Front, but at the foot of the Judean Hills in southern Palestine. The sun had just begun to set over the desert town of Beersheba   More »

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

By Michael D. Hull
Of all the workhorse weapons in the Allies’ World War II arsenal, from the American M-4 Sherman medium tank and jeep to the British Handley Page Halifax bomber and 25-pounder field gun, none was more widely and effectively deployed than the Douglas C-47 transport plane.
Dubbed the Skytrain by   More »

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

By Sam McGowan
 Undoubtedly, the World War II aircraft type that attracts the most attention is the fighter plane. Yet, before the war, the U.S. Army Air Corps paid little attention to fighter development and tactics because its senior officers, with certain exceptions, would later lead the Army Air Forces with   More »

U.S. Army Failure at Anzio: Prudence or Paralysis?

U.S. Army Failure at Anzio: Prudence or Paralysis?

By Steve Ossad
Hitler called it an “abscess.” British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, the chief sponsor and loudest cheerleader for the endeavor, grudgingly proclaimed it “a disaster.” Lt. Gen. Mark Clark, commander of the U.S. Fifth Army, described it as a “strip of hell.” American GIs, their British brothers-in-arms, and their   More »

World War II Special Forces

World War II Special Forces

By Michael E. Haskew
The concept of elite or “special” forces matured during World War II, and the term became synonymous with extraordinary heroism, particularly against long odds. The editors of WWII History magazine have put together a Special Issue, World War II Special Forces, entirely devoted to these units and   More »

Dutch Debacle

Dutch Debacle

By John W. Osborn, Jr.

 

When world war engulfed Europe for the second time in a generation, the Netherlands placed its faith in the diplomatic delusion that it could remain neutral like it had during World War I. When that failed it counted on a military miracle that turned out to   More »

Cannon Thunder at Valmy

Cannon Thunder at Valmy

By David A. Norris
Wind lifted away the fog sheltering the French lines. Atop a low ridge where the French army was deployed, a lone windmill provided a vivid range marker for 58 Prussian cannons on the neighboring hills. Shot fell like black hailstones amid the staff officers by the man-made   More »



Issue Previews

American Writers Who Avoided the Civil War

American Writers Who Avoided the Civil War

Mark Twain was not the only famous American writer to avoid fighting—and possibly dying—in the American Civil War.

The Rise and Fall of the German U-Boat

The Rise and Fall of the German U-Boat

German U-boats threatened the Allies in World War II, but tactical changes and sheer numbers eventually negated the undersea peril.

Evans Carlson & America’s First Special Operations Team

Evans Carlson & America’s First Special Operations Team

In 1942, Evans Carlson’s ‘Marine Raiders’ gained instant celebrity status as America’s first Special Operations team.

Eppa Hunton: Unsung Confederate Hero at the Battle of Ball’s Bluff

Eppa Hunton: Unsung Confederate Hero at the Battle of Ball’s Bluff

At the Battle of Ball’s Bluff, Colonel Eppa Hunton successfully rallied his command and played a key role in routing the Yankees.

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