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WWII Quarterly Winter 2018

Linchpin of the Mediterranean

Linchpin of the Mediterranean

By Mark Simmons
It was the humid season on Malta that September of 1943. The hot Sirocco winds from North Africa blow from August to October across the cool sea, raising humidity. The local sailors do not like them because the seas have time to build up and on land they   More »

Fighting from Tobruk to Milan

Fighting from Tobruk to Milan

By Brig. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond E. Bell
The contribution of the Union of South Africa’s armed forces to the winning of World War II is little known outside South Africa itself. Yet the country sent significant numbers of troops into battle against the Axis powers, both in the air and on   More »

The Flying Pipeline

The Flying Pipeline

By Patricia Overman
“Flying supply missions with the 435th Troop Carrier Group, or any tactical group of IX Troop Carrier Command, is a combination of taking a physical beating and sweating out land and aerial war hazards”
—Michael Seaman, Warweek Staff
Writer, Stars and Stripes, April 29, 1945
By April 1945 the Allied Armies   More »

Pearl Harbor Bombshell

Pearl Harbor Bombshell

By Susan Zimmerman
BACKSTORY: Although for the past 75 years history has had little to say about “Bally’s Project,” an effort to falsify State Department records to remove evidence of gross miscalculations prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor—the author recently discovered a small file of documents in the Frank A. Schuler,   More »

Angels In Olive Drab

Angels In Olive Drab

By Nathan N. Prefer
Of the many groups that fought in World War II and have been largely forgotten in the history of that great conflict, none are more neglected than the women who served and died doing their duty alongside the men of the United States Army.
Known as the United   More »

Assault Gun Tanker

Assault Gun Tanker

By Kevin M. Hymel
The German push west came to a violent end.
On December 19, 1944, the Panther and King Tiger tanks of SS Lt. Col. Joachim Peiper’s battle group smashed into the American tanks and tank destroyers of Lt. Col. George Rubel’s 740th Tank Battalion outside the Belgian town of   More »

WWII’s Tragic Aviation Accidents

WWII’s Tragic Aviation Accidents

By Mason Webb
It was Christmas Day, 1944. A U.S. Navy C-47 Skytrain with five men aboard was en route from Naval Air Station, Olathe, Kansas, to Columbus, Ohio. It was a routine training flight. The pilot was beginning his landing approach into the Indianapolis municipal airport but a heavy fog   More »

Ordeal at Cassino

Ordeal at Cassino

By Jon Diamond
Lt. Gen. Mark Clark’s Fifth Army, comprising the U.S. VI and British X Corps, headed north from the Salerno battlefield in September 1943, German Field Marshal Albert Kesselring, commander of Army Group C in southern Italy, implemented new defensive tactics and fortifications.
These were to be more effective at   More »

A Hidden Massacre in Belgium

A Hidden Massacre in Belgium

By Stephen D. Lutz
In the winter of 1944-1945, within Belgium’s Ardennes Forest, better known as the launching pad of the Battle of the Bulge, two war crimes were committed. The better known one—the “Malmedy Massacre”—resulted in the deaths of at least 85 defenseless GIs who surrendered. They were herded into   More »



Issue Previews

A Hard Mutt’s Life: “Military Dogs” in World War II

A Hard Mutt’s Life: “Military Dogs” in World War II

Below, the fox terrier ‘Salvo’ prepares for a drop over England. Military dogs played a key role in morale and companionship throughout the war.

A Wehrmacht Pioneer Laid to Rest 70 Years After Operation Barbarossa

A Wehrmacht Pioneer Laid to Rest 70 Years After Operation Barbarossa

Thanks to technological advances and local help, a Wehrmacht Pioneer was finally located and laid to rest years after Operation Barbarossa.

Emperor Julian “The Apostate”

Emperor Julian “The Apostate”

Emperor Julian ‘The Apostate’ sought to emulate Alexander the Great’s conquest of Persia, but Shapur II’s Savaran cavalry proved his undoing.

American Writers Who Avoided the Civil War

American Writers Who Avoided the Civil War

Mark Twain was not the only famous American writer to avoid fighting—and possibly dying—in the American Civil War.

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