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WWII History August 2017

Cultural Clash in New Caledonia

Cultural Clash in New Caledonia

By Gene E. Salecker
In June1940, when France capitulated to Nazi Germany, the victorious Germans agreed to let the French retain control over the southern portion of their country and all their colonial possessions. A de facto French government was established at Vichy under the direction of Marshal Philippe Pétain, the   More »

World War II’s Quiet Marine

World War II’s Quiet Marine

By Nathan N. Prefer
He organized, trained, and commanded the 4th Marine Division in the Marshall Islands and Saipan campaigns before taking command of the Fifth Amphibious Corps and leading it against Tinian and Iwo Jima. He was on the short list for commandant of the Marine Corps after World War   More »

The Return of B-24 Hadley’s Harem

The Return of B-24 Hadley’s Harem

By Duane Schultz

First Lieutenant Gilbert B. Hadley—he liked to be called “Gib”—wasburied back home in Kansas in 1997, some 54 years after he was killed in action on August 1, 1943. “He looked like Clark Gable,” a Kansas City newspaper wrote about Gib when he was young. He “could talk   More »

Carlson’s Raid on Makin

Carlson’s Raid on Makin

By David H. Lippman
In the darkness, the two American submarines moved toward the hostile beach, inching carefully through badly marked waters. They surfaced well before dawn, and the Marine Raiders and submarine crews began bringing up rubber boats from below, inflating them on deck, installing outboard motors, and filling them   More »

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

By Sam McGowan
 Undoubtedly, the World War II aircraft type that attracts the most attention is the fighter plane. Yet, before the war, the U.S. Army Air Corps paid little attention to fighter development and tactics because its senior officers, with certain exceptions, would later lead the Army Air Forces with   More »

U.S. Army Failure at Anzio: Prudence or Paralysis?

U.S. Army Failure at Anzio: Prudence or Paralysis?

By Steve Ossad
Hitler called it an “abscess.” British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, the chief sponsor and loudest cheerleader for the endeavor, grudgingly proclaimed it “a disaster.” Lt. Gen. Mark Clark, commander of the U.S. Fifth Army, described it as a “strip of hell.” American GIs, their British brothers-in-arms, and their   More »



Issue Previews

Japanese Sneak Attack on Sydney Harbor

Japanese Sneak Attack on Sydney Harbor

In May 1942, a Japanese submarine force snuck into Australia’s Sydney Harbor for a daring, suicidal attack.

Napoleon Bonaparte in Present-Day Israel

Napoleon Bonaparte in Present-Day Israel

When an Ottoman army surrounded Jean Kleber’s Division of Mount Tabor on April 16, 1799, the timely arrival of Napoleon Bonaparte ensured a French victory.

Nazi U-Boats At America’s Doorsteps

Nazi U-Boats At America’s Doorsteps

Nazi U-Boats brought World War II to America’s shores as they ravaged merchant shipping off the East Coast.

World War I Doughboys’ Bloody Baptism

World War I Doughboys’ Bloody Baptism

In their first major battles of World War I, American Expeditionary Force troops helped blunt multiple offensives launched by the German Army in the spring of 1918.

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