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WWII

WWII’s Tragic Aviation Accidents

WWII’s Tragic Aviation Accidents

By Mason Webb
It was Christmas Day, 1944. A U.S. Navy C-47 Skytrain with five men aboard was en route from Naval Air Station, Olathe, Kansas, to Columbus, Ohio. It was a routine training flight. The pilot was beginning his landing approach into the Indianapolis municipal airport but a heavy fog   More »

Warfare’s Unsung Pigeon

Warfare’s Unsung Pigeon

By G. Paul Garson
Battlefield communications are often a matter of life and death to individual soldiers and serve to determine not only the outcome of battles but entire wars. Lowly pigeons have played an intrinsic part in world conflicts, filling the gap when modern technology failed, but their story has   More »

WWII’s Forgotten “Missing”

WWII’s Forgotten “Missing”

By Flint Whitlock, Editor WWII Quarterly
Recently, I saw an article about American MIAs—those service members who went “missing in action” during World War  II—and, frankly, was taken aback. According to figures from the U.S. Department of Defense’s POW/MIA Accounting Agency, more than 80,000 World War II soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines   More »

The Bitter Hurtgen Forest Battle

The Bitter Hurtgen Forest Battle

By Michael Haskew, Editor

For three months during the autumn and winter of 1944, the U.S. First Army was locked in a death grip with the tenacious German defenders of the Hurtgen Forest, an area of 54 square miles east of the Belgian frontier.  When the battle was over, First Army   More »

The Forgotten Fleet

The Forgotten Fleet

By Arnold Blumberg
British naval operations in the Far East in World War II started badly and went downhill from there. Years of underfunding in defense meant that Britain simply did not have the means to defend its huge empire, and for 18 months prior to the Japanese attack on the   More »

Deadly Duel Above Berlin

Deadly Duel Above Berlin

By Mark Mathosian
“Our mission was Berlin. We flew in that dreaded position—last and lowest in the squadron.”
Archie Mathosian, B-17 Radio Operator, A/C #521 (Skyway Chariot), 100th Bomb Group (H), USAAF
“Last and lowest in the squadron.”These words may not mean much to most readers, but to the crew of a Boeing   More »

Mayhem in Burma’s Jungles

Mayhem in Burma’s Jungles

By Tom Crowley
Special operations soldiers have existed since armed forces were first organized. Arguably, the hand-picked Greek warriors concealed inside the Trojan horse outside the gates of Troy 3,000 years ago were the first “special ops” troops.
During the French & Indian War in America, a unique band of frontiersmen, Rogers’   More »

82nd Airborne POW: Riding the German Rail

82nd Airborne POW: Riding the German Rail

By Richard A. Beranty
The large number of Allied prisoners being funneled south to Rennes, France, following the D-Day invasion swelled the German transit camp to capacity so the decision was made to transport the men to permanent locations inside Germany. They had been captured from all points of the Normandy   More »

German Failure at Kursk

German Failure at Kursk

By Pat McTaggart
Colonel General Walter Model was a rising star in the German Army in early 1943. The son of a music teacher, Model was born on January 24, 1891, in Genthin, Saxony-Anhalt. In 1909, he joined the Kaiser’s army as an officer candidate, but the harsh training almost made   More »

Marching Through New Georgia

Marching Through New Georgia

By Jon Diamond
Vice Admiral William “Bull” Halsey, commander of the U.S. 3rd Fleet, did not want another protracted campaign like he had experienced while trying to take Munda in New Georgia. He stated, “The undue length of the Munda operation and our casualties made me wary of another slugging match,   More »



Issue Previews

Japanese Sneak Attack on Sydney Harbor

Japanese Sneak Attack on Sydney Harbor

In May 1942, a Japanese submarine force snuck into Australia’s Sydney Harbor for a daring, suicidal attack.

Napoleon Bonaparte in Present-Day Israel

Napoleon Bonaparte in Present-Day Israel

When an Ottoman army surrounded Jean Kleber’s Division of Mount Tabor on April 16, 1799, the timely arrival of Napoleon Bonaparte ensured a French victory.

Nazi U-Boats At America’s Doorsteps

Nazi U-Boats At America’s Doorsteps

Nazi U-Boats brought World War II to America’s shores as they ravaged merchant shipping off the East Coast.

World War I Doughboys’ Bloody Baptism

World War I Doughboys’ Bloody Baptism

In their first major battles of World War I, American Expeditionary Force troops helped blunt multiple offensives launched by the German Army in the spring of 1918.

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