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Turning the Tide

Turning the Tide

By Michael E. Haskew
In October 1942, at an obscure railroad whistlestop in the wastes ofthe Egyptian desert, the tide of World War II turned. True enough, Nazi spearheads had failed to take Moscow, capital of the Soviet Union, before the grueling winter of 1941 set in. However, the Germans had   More »

The Last Days of the USS DeHaven

The Last Days of the USS DeHaven

By John J. Domagalski
General Alexander Patch had been thinking about moving some troops to the southwestern part of Guadalcanal since taking command of all American ground forces on the embattled island on December 9, 1942. Little more than a month later his soldiers were cautiously pushing the remaining Japanese troops   More »

Uncommon Allies in Malaya

Uncommon Allies in Malaya

By John Osborne. Jr.
One of World War II’s longest, least known guerrilla resistance campaigns was fought in the depths of the jungle covering 80 percent of Malaya’s 50,850 square miles; in it the most unlikely of friendships would develop, leading to a remarkable meeting, then parting, a decade later.
In 1941,   More »

Carlson’s Raid on Makin

Carlson’s Raid on Makin

By David H. Lippman
In the darkness, the two American submarines moved toward the hostile beach, inching carefully through badly marked waters. They surfaced well before dawn, and the Marine Raiders and submarine crews began bringing up rubber boats from below, inflating them on deck, installing outboard motors, and filling them   More »

The Second Pearl Harbor

The Second Pearl Harbor

By Gene E. Salecker
The first explosion came as a complete surprise to everyone around Pearl Harbor. The Sunday had started out clear and bright, but the sky quickly darkened as great clouds of thick black smoke rose high above the burning ships.
Fuel oil spilled atop the water and caught fire,   More »

The defective Mark 14 torpedo

The defective Mark 14 torpedo

By Mark Carlson
Lieutenant Dan Daspit, captain of the U.S. submarine Tinosa could notbelieve his luck. Framed neatly in the periscope eyepiece was a sitting duck. The 19,250-ton Japanese tanker Tonan Maru No. 3 was all alone, dead in the water. Tinosa was on her second war patrol, having left Midway atoll on   More »

Death of the Tirpitz

Death of the Tirpitz

By Blaine Taylor
April 1, 1939, was a red-letter day in the history of the reborn German Kriegsmarine for two key reasons. First, Reich Chancellor Adolf Hitler presented the fleet’s chief, Erich Raeder, with an ornate, icon-studded Navy blue baton of office as the first grand admiral since the days of   More »



Issue Previews

Medal of Honor Recipient: Henry “Red” Erwin

Medal of Honor Recipient: Henry “Red” Erwin

Sergeant Red Erwin’s courage in a burning B-29 over Japan saved the lives of his crewmen and earned him the Medal of Honor.

One Gallant Rush: Black Soldiers at Fort Wagner

One Gallant Rush: Black Soldiers at Fort Wagner

The African Americans of the 54th Massachusetts stood up to the guns of Charleston’s Fort Wagner in a bloody assault in 1863. In so doing, they proved themselves worthy Union soldiers.

Behind  Enemy Lines: Escape at the Bulge

Behind Enemy Lines: Escape at the Bulge

An American infantry sergeant survived three days behind enemy lines during the opening chapter of the Battle of the Bulge.

Could the United States Have Gone to War With France Over Mexico?

Could the United States Have Gone to War With France Over Mexico?

Continued French meddling in Mexico almost led to a post-Civil War confrontation with the United States.

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