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The defective Mark 14 torpedo

The defective Mark 14 torpedo

By Mark Carlson
Lieutenant Dan Daspit, captain of the U.S. submarine Tinosa could notbelieve his luck. Framed neatly in the periscope eyepiece was a sitting duck. The 19,250-ton Japanese tanker Tonan Maru No. 3 was all alone, dead in the water. Tinosa was on her second war patrol, having left Midway atoll on   More »

Combat in Normandy’s Hedgerows

Combat in Normandy’s Hedgerows

By Scott A. Bryan

Late in the evening on D-Day two German soldiers patrolled the outskirts of Colleville-sur-Mer, about one mile from Omaha Beach, and spotted Company C, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division resting in a hedgerow field. Standing on opposite corners, the enemy unleashed machine-gun fire and killed seven Americans.   More »

World War II Special Forces

World War II Special Forces

By Michael E. Haskew
The concept of elite or “special” forces matured during World War II, and the term became synonymous with extraordinary heroism, particularly against long odds. The editors of WWII History magazine have put together a Special Issue, World War II Special Forces, entirely devoted to these units and   More »

Death of the Tirpitz

Death of the Tirpitz

By Blaine Taylor
April 1, 1939, was a red-letter day in the history of the reborn German Kriegsmarine for two key reasons. First, Reich Chancellor Adolf Hitler presented the fleet’s chief, Erich Raeder, with an ornate, icon-studded Navy blue baton of office as the first grand admiral since the days of   More »

Bloodbath in Aachen

Bloodbath in Aachen

With weapons at the ready, the American squad advanced cautiously on both sides of the tree-lined boulevard toward the German strongpoint in Aachen. Buildings pummeled by Allied shells had toppled to the ground, sending concrete and bricks spilling into the street. Hardly a structure remained intact as a result of   More »

Women of the Blue and Grey

Women of the Blue and Grey

A new book by Marianne Monson

During the Victorian era, when photography exposures were painfully long, it was common practice to take photographs of children by placing them on the laps of their mothers, who were completely obscured by a veil. The intent, of course, was to keep a squirmy child   More »



Issue Previews

A Hard Mutt’s Life: “Military Dogs” in World War II

A Hard Mutt’s Life: “Military Dogs” in World War II

Below, the fox terrier ‘Salvo’ prepares for a drop over England. Military dogs played a key role in morale and companionship throughout the war.

A Wehrmacht Pioneer Laid to Rest 70 Years After Operation Barbarossa

A Wehrmacht Pioneer Laid to Rest 70 Years After Operation Barbarossa

Thanks to technological advances and local help, a Wehrmacht Pioneer was finally located and laid to rest years after Operation Barbarossa.

Emperor Julian “The Apostate”

Emperor Julian “The Apostate”

Emperor Julian ‘The Apostate’ sought to emulate Alexander the Great’s conquest of Persia, but Shapur II’s Savaran cavalry proved his undoing.

American Writers Who Avoided the Civil War

American Writers Who Avoided the Civil War

Mark Twain was not the only famous American writer to avoid fighting—and possibly dying—in the American Civil War.

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