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NATO

WWI’s Daring Cavalry Charge

WWI’s Daring Cavalry Charge

By Alex Zakrzewski

In late 1917, the most successful cavalry charge of World War I took place not on the muddy killing fields of the Western Front, but at the foot of the Judean Hills in southern Palestine. The sun had just begun to set over the desert town of Beersheba   More »

U.S. Army Failure at Anzio: Prudence or Paralysis?

U.S. Army Failure at Anzio: Prudence or Paralysis?

By Steve Ossad
Hitler called it an “abscess.” British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, the chief sponsor and loudest cheerleader for the endeavor, grudgingly proclaimed it “a disaster.” Lt. Gen. Mark Clark, commander of the U.S. Fifth Army, described it as a “strip of hell.” American GIs, their British brothers-in-arms, and their   More »

The GI Forum: Justice for Hispanic Veterans of WWII

The GI Forum: Justice for Hispanic Veterans of WWII

By Mike Shepherd
Hector Garcia was born in Llera, Tamaulipas, Mexico, on January 17,1914, to schoolteacher parents, Jose Garcia Garcia and Faustina Perez Garcia. The Mexican Revolution drove them from their homes in 1917 and his family legally immigrated to Mercedes, Texas.
Hector’s father, a teacher in Mexico, was not allowed to   More »

Immortal Charge of the Light Brigade

Immortal Charge of the Light Brigade

By Christopher Miskimon
Six battalions of Russian infantry, 30 cannons, and a cavalry force deployed in the North Valley east of Sevastopol near the town of Balaclava. They occupied three sides of the valley, looking down on it. The other end was in the hands of the British Army. Spread across   More »

Women of the Blue and Grey

Women of the Blue and Grey

A new book by Marianne Monson

During the Victorian era, when photography exposures were painfully long, it was common practice to take photographs of children by placing them on the laps of their mothers, who were completely obscured by a veil. The intent, of course, was to keep a squirmy child   More »

Bloody Clash on the Tiber

Bloody Clash on the Tiber

By Tim Miller

 

On October 28, ad 312, a Roman emperor was drowning. The sight must have amazed his soldiers. All summer Rome had been filled with rumors of the western emperor, Constantine, and the ease with which he and his army had crossed the Alps and, once on Italian soil,   More »

The defective Mark 14 torpedo

The defective Mark 14 torpedo

By Mark Carlson
Lieutenant Dan Daspit, captain of the U.S. submarine Tinosa could notbelieve his luck. Framed neatly in the periscope eyepiece was a sitting duck. The 19,250-ton Japanese tanker Tonan Maru No. 3 was all alone, dead in the water. Tinosa was on her second war patrol, having left Midway atoll on   More »

German Failure at Kursk

German Failure at Kursk

By Pat McTaggart
Colonel General Walter Model was a rising star in the German Army in early 1943. The son of a music teacher, Model was born on January 24, 1891, in Genthin, Saxony-Anhalt. In 1909, he joined the Kaiser’s army as an officer candidate, but the harsh training almost made   More »



Issue Previews

American Writers Who Avoided the Civil War

American Writers Who Avoided the Civil War

Mark Twain was not the only famous American writer to avoid fighting—and possibly dying—in the American Civil War.

The Rise and Fall of the German U-Boat

The Rise and Fall of the German U-Boat

German U-boats threatened the Allies in World War II, but tactical changes and sheer numbers eventually negated the undersea peril.

Evans Carlson & America’s First Special Operations Team

Evans Carlson & America’s First Special Operations Team

In 1942, Evans Carlson’s ‘Marine Raiders’ gained instant celebrity status as America’s first Special Operations team.

Eppa Hunton: Unsung Confederate Hero at the Battle of Ball’s Bluff

Eppa Hunton: Unsung Confederate Hero at the Battle of Ball’s Bluff

At the Battle of Ball’s Bluff, Colonel Eppa Hunton successfully rallied his command and played a key role in routing the Yankees.

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