Hannibal could probably have taken Rome itself immediately after the Battle of Cannae, so why didn't he?

Hannibal

Hannibal, Rome and Cannae

by Keith Milton

It could be argued that Hannibal’s hesitation to go after Rome shortly after Cannae was because he lacked a siege train. Read more

The accomplishments of Hannibal were great, even in his own time, but the underestimation of the resiliency of his enemy proved to be his undoing.

Hannibal

Hannibal of Carthage: Scourge of Rome

By Jonas L. Goldstein

The accomplishments of Hannibal from his departure from Spain, his crossing of the Alps, and his battles on the Italian peninsula, climaxing with his great victory at Cannae, were enough to permanently etch his name among the greatest military leaders of history. Read more

The embarrassing Union Army defeat at the Battle of Ball’s Bluff on October 21, 1861, was only the beginning of Brig. Gen. Charles P. Stone’s troubles.

Hannibal

Union Army Defeat at the Battle of Ball’s Bluff

By Conan Brew

In the wake of the humiliating and unexpected defeat, and fourth in a line that stretched back to Fort Sumter, the Battle of Bull Run, and the Battle of Wilson’s Creek, the Union Congress created a seven-man Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War to oversee and review all battles and the events surrounding them. Read more

Hannibal

How Hannibal Hammered the Roman Army

By Keith Milton

Gisgo, a commander in the Carthaginian army, sat on his horse nervously as he waited with other members of the staff for their general, the now-famous Hannibal, to complete his final inspection. Read more