WWII Quarterly

Winter 2016

Volume 7, No. 2

COVER: A .50-caliber “tunnel- mounted” machine gun is fired from the bomb bay of a B-24 in 1942, prior to the introduction of the ball turret. Photo: National Archives

Winter 2016

WWII Quarterly, Editorial

The Syrian Refugee Crisis: A Repeat of the 1930s?

by Flint Whitlock

The pictures are heartbreaking.

Thousands of refugees fleeing persecution by their government and possible death in their homeland, leaving all their possessions behind, spending their life savings and risking almost anything to escape an existence that had become intolerable. Read more

Winter 2016

WWII Quarterly, Museums

The American Air Museum in Duxford

By Roy Stevenson

In the lush, green rural community of Duxford, a 20-minute bus ride from the university town of Cambridge, the American Air Museum in Britain houses the finest collection of historic American combat aircraft outside the United States. Read more

Winter 2016

WWII Quarterly, Weaponry

The P-39 Airacobra

By Phil Zimmer

The P-39 Airacobra was a bit like Rodney Dangerfield—it “couldn’t get no respect,” especially from those who never piloted the “Flying Cannon” built by the Buffalo, New York-based Bell Aircraft Corp. Read more

Winter 2016

WWII Quarterly

Brutal Battle for a Dutch Island

By Jon Diamond

Look at a map of Holland. At the extreme southwest corner, connected to the mainland by a narrow causeway, is a peninsula known as Walcheren Island jutting into the North Sea. Read more

Winter 2016

WWII Quarterly

The White and Black Ship

By Stephen D. Lutz

During World War II, the U.S. Navy built more than 1,000 destroyer escorts, ships whose primary duty was to escort supply convoys across the world’s oceans to insure that their precious cargo of food, fuel, war material, and personnel got to their destinations safely. Read more

Winter 2016

WWII Quarterly

Bombs, Booze, and Broads

By Glenn Barnett

The date of November 10, 1942, is still vivid in the mind of Albert Wayne Boam. That was the day that he enlisted in the Army Air Corps, hoping to become a fighter pilot. Read more

Winter 2016

WWII Quarterly

Rangers Led the Way at Zerf

By Nathan Prefer

Without a doubt, the U.S. Army’s Ranger battalions were considered among the elite formations of World War II. Read more

Winter 2016

WWII Quarterly

“Butch” O’Hare: the Original Top Gun

By Patrick Reynolds

Edward Henry “Butch” O’Hare rocketed to fame in February 1942 by singlehandedly taking on eight Japanese torpedo bombers bent on destroying the aircraft carrier USS Lexington and shooting down several of them. Read more