In 1649, at Drogheda, Cromwell’s men stormed hotly into the city. “No quarter!” they cried.

King Charles II

No Quarter at Drogheda

By Al Hemingway

On the morning of September 2, 1649, peering over the immense 20-foot-high wall that surrounded the Irish city of Drogheda, English Royalist general Sir Arthur Aston did not like what he saw. Read more

For the long-suffering citizens of London, the sight of a Dutch fleet sailing up the Medway River was the last in a string of disasters.

King Charles II

The Father of the Royal Navy

By Eric Niderost

Samuel Pepys is best known for the diary he wrote from 1660 to 1669. Because it was never intended for publication, the diary is frank and even ribald. Read more

For the long-suffering citizens of London, the sight of a Dutch fleet sailing up the Medway River was the last in a string of disasters.

King Charles II

Twisting the Lion’s Tail: Dutch Raid up the Medway River

By Eric Niderost

Lieutenant-Admiral Michiel de Ruyter was a man of action, but he could be formidable even in repose On June 7, 1667, de Ruyter was sitting in the great cabin of the Dutch flagship Harderwijk listening stolidly while Cornelius de Witt finally revealed his plans for a raid on England to a group of assembled naval officers. Read more