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WWI’s Daring Cavalry Charge

WWI’s Daring Cavalry Charge

By Alex Zakrzewski

In late 1917, the most successful cavalry charge of World War I took place not on the muddy killing fields of the Western Front, but at the foot of the Judean Hills in southern Palestine. The sun had just begun to set over the desert town of Beersheba   More »

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

By Michael D. Hull
Of all the workhorse weapons in the Allies’ World War II arsenal, from the American M-4 Sherman medium tank and jeep to the British Handley Page Halifax bomber and 25-pounder field gun, none was more widely and effectively deployed than the Douglas C-47 transport plane.
Dubbed the Skytrain by   More »

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

By Sam McGowan
 Undoubtedly, the World War II aircraft type that attracts the most attention is the fighter plane. Yet, before the war, the U.S. Army Air Corps paid little attention to fighter development and tactics because its senior officers, with certain exceptions, would later lead the Army Air Forces with   More »

Immortal Charge of the Light Brigade

Immortal Charge of the Light Brigade

By Christopher Miskimon
Six battalions of Russian infantry, 30 cannons, and a cavalry force deployed in the North Valley east of Sevastopol near the town of Balaclava. They occupied three sides of the valley, looking down on it. The other end was in the hands of the British Army. Spread across   More »

Bloodbath in Aachen

Bloodbath in Aachen

With weapons at the ready, the American squad advanced cautiously on both sides of the tree-lined boulevard toward the German strongpoint in Aachen. Buildings pummeled by Allied shells had toppled to the ground, sending concrete and bricks spilling into the street. Hardly a structure remained intact as a result of   More »

Pickett’s Charge: We Gained Nothing but Glory

Pickett’s Charge: We Gained Nothing but Glory

 

By Eric Niderost

July 3, 1863, dawned clear and bright, the warm sun promising even greater heat to come. By noon, temperatures were already in the low 90s, a typically hot and humid summer day in southern Pennsylvania. The action on the ground would soon get even hotter. Five days earlier,   More »



Issue Previews

Evans Carlson & America’s First Special Operations Team

Evans Carlson & America’s First Special Operations Team

In 1942, Evans Carlson’s ‘Marine Raiders’ gained instant celebrity status as America’s first Special Operations team.

Eppa Hunton: Unsung Confederate Hero at the Battle of Ball’s Bluff

Eppa Hunton: Unsung Confederate Hero at the Battle of Ball’s Bluff

At the Battle of Ball’s Bluff, Colonel Eppa Hunton successfully rallied his command and played a key role in routing the Yankees.

Letters Home from the Battle of the Bulge

Letters Home from the Battle of the Bulge

During the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge, Flint Whitlock shares a letter written by Sergeant David Warman to his family on Christmas Day in 1944.

After the Lincoln Assassination: The World-Wide Manhunt for John Surratt

After the Lincoln Assassination: The World-Wide Manhunt for John Surratt

John Surratt somehow escaped justice after the Lincoln assassination despite being intimately acquainted with John Wilkes Booth and other conspirators.

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