November 2004

Volume 3, No. 6

American soldiers from the 11th Armored Division and the 84th Infantry Division meet in Houffalize, Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge. Photo courtesy of the National Archives.

U.S. Navy Helldiver aircraft attack the Japanese battleship Musashi in the Sibuyan Sea during the Battle of Leyte Gulf. Painting by Sam L. Massette.

November 2004

WWII History

Battle of Sibuyan Sea

By John Wukovits

In warfare, desperate times call for desperate measures, and in the fall of 1944 the empire of Japan found itself in precisely that predicament. Read more

American tanks and armored gun carriers drive over snow-covered terrain to Samree during the Battle of the Bulge. Capture of the city opened the way to Houffallize, heart of the Bulge.

November 2004

WWII History

The End of the Battle of the Bulge

By Arnold Blumberg

Wednesday, December 27, 1944, found the military situation in the Ardennes Forest of Belgium stalemated. After 12 days of unrelenting struggle, the American and German forces on this part of the Western Front found themselves locked in brutal combat, unable to drive each other back. Read more

November 2004

WWII History

General Douglas MacArthur’s Navy

By Glenn Barnett

In November 1941, the U.S. Asiatic Fleet weighed anchor in Shanghai, China, for the last time. Alarmed by the growing hostility and aggressiveness of the Japanese, Admiral Thomas Hart ordered the outnumbered and outgunned American vessels moved to the relative safety of Manila Bay in the Philippines. Read more

Students at the U.S. Maritime Service Training Station on Long Island, N.Y., practice putting on Morner lifesaving suits, which could keep them warm and buoyant in cold water.

November 2004

WWII History

Saving Men from Poseidon

By Kevin M. Hymel

The harsh elements of the world’s oceans and seas were undoubtedly just as dangerous to U.S. sailors as the German or Japanese navies. Read more

Thick sulphurous smoke pours from the flaming wreckage of a B-17 bomber in a French field.

November 2004

WWII History

The Hidden Freedom Trail

by Adam Lynch

A few moments after his stricken Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bomber tore apart, co-pilot Ralph Patton hurriedly put his bail-out plan into action. Read more

November 2004

WWII History

The Many Faces of Adolf Hitler

By Kevin M. Hymel

As the Allied armies in the West closed in on Germany in late September 1944, one question began to dog many of democracy’s leaders. Read more

Embattled Tobruk lies under a pall of smoke during Rommel’s push to capture the vital North African port city in the spring of 1941.

November 2004

WWII History

The Siege of Tobruk: WWII’s Debacle in the Desert

by Michael D. Hull

Sidi Barrani, Bardia, Sollum, Sidi Rezegh, Mersa Matruh, Bir Hacheim, El Agheila, Beda Fomm, Sidi Omar, Benghazi … The names of many remote villages in North Africa were written into history in 1941-1942 as British and Axis armies battled back and forth across the scrubby desert wastelands of northern Egypt and Libya. Read more

November 2004

WWII History, Editorial

General Anthony McAuliffe

When word of the German breakthrough in the Ardennes Forest began to move back to the rear echelons of the American command in Western Europe, General Maxwell Taylor, commanding officer of the 101st Airborne Division, was attending a conference in Washington, D.C. Read more

November 2004

WWII History, Dispatches

G4MI mk 11’s

Dear Editors,

I very much enjoy your magazine and the in-depth articles therein. In the January 2004 issue Mike Slater’s article “Desperate Marianas Counterstroke” was particularly interesting. Read more

George S. Patton’s bull terrier Wille waits quietly for his late master to return.

November 2004

WWII History, Insight

Patton’s Death

By Blaine Taylor

It was 11:45 am, on December 9, 1945, and former U.S. Third Army Commanding General George Smith Patton, Jr., Read more

November 2004

WWII History, Top Secret

Operation Greif: Assassinate Eisenhower?

By Charles Whiting

Sixty years ago, on the morning of Monday, December 18, 1944, a mixed group of white MPs and black American service troops stood guard on the little bridge at Aywaille in the Ardennes Forest of Belgium. Read more

November 2004

WWII History, Books

Inside Stalag 17

By Sam Mcgowan

On June 6, 1944, Allied troops landed in Normandy, commencing the offensive that liberated Western Europe and contributed to the final Allied victory in Europe. Read more