Ernest Hemingway

The Battle of Hürtgen Forest: Army Rangers vs Fallschirmjägers

By James Marino

Mired in combat during the Battle of Hürtgen Forest of Germany, an American soldier wrote in December 5, 1944: “The road to the front led straight and muddy brown between the billowing greenery of the broken topless firs, and in the jeeps that were coming back they were bringing the still living. Read more

The U.S. Office of Strategic Services recruited Germans to infiltrate the Third Reich.

Ernest Hemingway

OSS in Germany

By John Mancini

By the autumn of 1944, most of Nazi-occupied Europe had been liberated by Allied forces. The conquering armies now faced the invasion of the German homeland. Read more

The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum at Hyde Park is the premier research center for the FDR era.

Ernest Hemingway

The FDR Presidential Library

By Blaine Taylor

It seems to me that the dedication of a library is in itself an act of faith.” The date was June 30, 1941, and the speaker was President Franklin D. Read more

A young writer, J.R.R. Tolkien, witnessed the worst day of British military history–World War I’s Battle of the Somme–and lived to tell about it.

Ernest Hemingway

A Hobbit on the Somme

By O’brien Browne

Smoke and ash drifted across the shattered ground. Dead faces peered up with lidless eyes from pools of stagnant water. Read more

Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway and the Ivy Leaguers in World War II

by Charles Whiting

During the second week of July 1944 a young, sharp Lieutenant Goldstein of the 4th Infantry Division’s 22nd Infantry Regiment was told by his boss, Colonel Buck Lanhan, “Expect a special civilian, a big war correspondent is coming to visit us. Read more

Author Ernest Hemingway tracked German U-boats aboard his yacht in the Caribbean.

Ernest Hemingway

Hemingway Goes Sub Chasing

By Robert E. Cray, Jr.

“We are going to have Christ’s own bitter time to win it, if, when, and ever,” commented Ernest Hemingway to his friend and editor, Charles Scribner, at the start of World War II. Read more

Franklin D. Roosevelt employed a network of friends and contacts in covert roles, which inspired the creation of the OSS.

Ernest Hemingway

Creating the OSS: FDR’s Network of Personal Spies

by Peter Kross

One of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s longtime interests was the hidden world of espionage. In the months before the United States entered World War II, the commander-in-chief was dabbling in the covert world of intelligence-gathering, using a number of trusted personal friends as his own private eyes and ears around the globe. Read more

Famed Author Ernest Hemingway Experienced World War II From the Caribbean to D-day’s Normandy Beaches.

Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway’s War

By Roy Morris, Jr.

When the United States entered World War II in December 1941, the nation’s most famous writer, a man who had built his reputation on gritty and intense novels about wars, soldiers, and “grace under pressure,” was nowhere to be seen—at least not on the home front. Read more