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Braddock’s Defeat in the Wilderness

Braddock’s Defeat in the Wilderness

By David A. Norris
 Captain Daniel Lienard de Beaujeu rushed to save the remote French outpost of Fort Duquesne in early July 1755. Weeks away from receiving substantial reinforcements, the fort was the target of British Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock. With Braddock was the largest army in the North American frontier,   More »

The Second Pearl Harbor

The Second Pearl Harbor

By Gene E. Salecker
The first explosion came as a complete surprise to everyone around Pearl Harbor. The Sunday had started out clear and bright, but the sky quickly darkened as great clouds of thick black smoke rose high above the burning ships.
Fuel oil spilled atop the water and caught fire,   More »

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

By Michael D. Hull
Of all the workhorse weapons in the Allies’ World War II arsenal, from the American M-4 Sherman medium tank and jeep to the British Handley Page Halifax bomber and 25-pounder field gun, none was more widely and effectively deployed than the Douglas C-47 transport plane.
Dubbed the Skytrain by   More »

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

By Sam McGowan
 Undoubtedly, the World War II aircraft type that attracts the most attention is the fighter plane. Yet, before the war, the U.S. Army Air Corps paid little attention to fighter development and tactics because its senior officers, with certain exceptions, would later lead the Army Air Forces with   More »

Raid on Holly Springs, Mississippi

Raid on Holly Springs, Mississippi

By William E. Welsh
The horsemen charged into the town from the northeast guns blazing and screaming the hair-raising Rebel yell. Yankees wearing their sleepwear struggled to get out of their tents in the dawn attack and then ran for their lives. The railroad depot of Holly Springs, Mississippi, was under   More »

Immortal Charge of the Light Brigade

Immortal Charge of the Light Brigade

By Christopher Miskimon
Six battalions of Russian infantry, 30 cannons, and a cavalry force deployed in the North Valley east of Sevastopol near the town of Balaclava. They occupied three sides of the valley, looking down on it. The other end was in the hands of the British Army. Spread across   More »

Pickett’s Charge: We Gained Nothing but Glory

Pickett’s Charge: We Gained Nothing but Glory

 

By Eric Niderost

July 3, 1863, dawned clear and bright, the warm sun promising even greater heat to come. By noon, temperatures were already in the low 90s, a typically hot and humid summer day in southern Pennsylvania. The action on the ground would soon get even hotter. Five days earlier,   More »

Dutch Debacle

Dutch Debacle

By John W. Osborn, Jr.

 

When world war engulfed Europe for the second time in a generation, the Netherlands placed its faith in the diplomatic delusion that it could remain neutral like it had during World War I. When that failed it counted on a military miracle that turned out to   More »

Bloody Clash on the Tiber

Bloody Clash on the Tiber

By Tim Miller

 

On October 28, ad 312, a Roman emperor was drowning. The sight must have amazed his soldiers. All summer Rome had been filled with rumors of the western emperor, Constantine, and the ease with which he and his army had crossed the Alps and, once on Italian soil,   More »



Issue Previews

A Hard Mutt’s Life: “Military Dogs” in World War II

A Hard Mutt’s Life: “Military Dogs” in World War II

Below, the fox terrier ‘Salvo’ prepares for a drop over England. Military dogs played a key role in morale and companionship throughout the war.

A Wehrmacht Pioneer Laid to Rest 70 Years After Operation Barbarossa

A Wehrmacht Pioneer Laid to Rest 70 Years After Operation Barbarossa

Thanks to technological advances and local help, a Wehrmacht Pioneer was finally located and laid to rest years after Operation Barbarossa.

Emperor Julian “The Apostate”

Emperor Julian “The Apostate”

Emperor Julian ‘The Apostate’ sought to emulate Alexander the Great’s conquest of Persia, but Shapur II’s Savaran cavalry proved his undoing.

American Writers Who Avoided the Civil War

American Writers Who Avoided the Civil War

Mark Twain was not the only famous American writer to avoid fighting—and possibly dying—in the American Civil War.

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