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Wehrmacht Operation to Take Leningrad Aborted

Wehrmacht Operation to Take Leningrad Aborted

By Pat McTaggart
It was called Nordlicht, or Northern Lights. With Hitler’s drive toward Stalingrad in full swing, the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW—German Armed Forces High Command) was also planning to end the almost year-long siege of Leningrad in a two-pronged attack to capture the city.
Failing to take Leningrad in 1941,   More »

25 Missions Over Fortress Europe

25 Missions Over Fortress Europe

By Kevin M. Hymel
“Bombs away!”called out the bombardier of the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bomber Great Speckled Bird, signaling the release of a full bombload over an enemy target. He was wrong. Two stubborn bombs refused to fall, remaining in their bomb bay racks.
The bomber’s radioman, Technical Sergeant Thomas Fitzpatrick,   More »

Britain’s Broomstick Army

Britain’s Broomstick Army

By Michael Hull
As powerful, fast-moving German panzer and infantry columnsrampaged across Belgium, Holland, Luxembourg, and into northern France early in May 1940, the British held their breath and watched apprehensively from across the narrow English Channel.
The lightning “blitzkrieg” advance split the retreating French and British armies, and the outlook was   More »

Failure of Hitler’s Terror Weapons

Failure of Hitler’s Terror Weapons

By Adam Lynch
During any war, combating countries predictably issue reports andcreate publicity more favorable to their own side. Often the difference is subtle, but sometimes it is profound. A perfect example occurred during World War II as Germany unleashed its V-1 and V-2 onslaught against England. Both governments were well   More »

Death of the Graf Spee

Death of the Graf Spee

By Michael D. Hull
When German dictator Adolf Hitler loosed his troops into Poland on Friday, September 1, 1939, he hoped that a lightning conquest would result in a negotiated peace with Great Britain and France.
Hitler’s previous territorial moves during the appeasement years had failed to provoke the two nations into   More »

WWI’s Daring Cavalry Charge

WWI’s Daring Cavalry Charge

By Alex Zakrzewski

In late 1917, the most successful cavalry charge of World War I took place not on the muddy killing fields of the Western Front, but at the foot of the Judean Hills in southern Palestine. The sun had just begun to set over the desert town of Beersheba   More »

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

By Michael D. Hull
Of all the workhorse weapons in the Allies’ World War II arsenal, from the American M-4 Sherman medium tank and jeep to the British Handley Page Halifax bomber and 25-pounder field gun, none was more widely and effectively deployed than the Douglas C-47 transport plane.
Dubbed the Skytrain by   More »

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

By Sam McGowan
 Undoubtedly, the World War II aircraft type that attracts the most attention is the fighter plane. Yet, before the war, the U.S. Army Air Corps paid little attention to fighter development and tactics because its senior officers, with certain exceptions, would later lead the Army Air Forces with   More »

German Failure at Kursk

German Failure at Kursk

By Pat McTaggart
Colonel General Walter Model was a rising star in the German Army in early 1943. The son of a music teacher, Model was born on January 24, 1891, in Genthin, Saxony-Anhalt. In 1909, he joined the Kaiser’s army as an officer candidate, but the harsh training almost made   More »



Issue Previews

Could the United States Have Gone to War With France Over Mexico?

Could the United States Have Gone to War With France Over Mexico?

Continued French meddling in Mexico almost led to a post-Civil War confrontation with the United States.

Action off Santa Cruz: Last Stand of the USS Hornet

Action off Santa Cruz: Last Stand of the USS Hornet

A tactical Japanese naval victory off Santa Cruz actually hastened the defeat of the empire.

Clash of the Ironclads

Clash of the Ironclads

A “barracks roof” and a “cheese box” met in March 1862 at Hampton Roads. The pioneer ironclads pounded each other with their heavy guns.

Hot Air “Fire Balloons”: Japan’s Project Fugo

Hot Air “Fire Balloons”: Japan’s Project Fugo

In late 1944, Japan began the massive production of ‘fire balloons’ capable of attacking American soil from their homeland. How did they make this work? And why did they stop?

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