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Wehrmacht Operation to Take Leningrad Aborted

Wehrmacht Operation to Take Leningrad Aborted

By Pat McTaggart
It was called Nordlicht, or Northern Lights. With Hitler’s drive toward Stalingrad in full swing, the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW—German Armed Forces High Command) was also planning to end the almost year-long siege of Leningrad in a two-pronged attack to capture the city.
Failing to take Leningrad in 1941,   More »

25 Missions Over Fortress Europe

25 Missions Over Fortress Europe

By Kevin M. Hymel
“Bombs away!”called out the bombardier of the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bomber Great Speckled Bird, signaling the release of a full bombload over an enemy target. He was wrong. Two stubborn bombs refused to fall, remaining in their bomb bay racks.
The bomber’s radioman, Technical Sergeant Thomas Fitzpatrick,   More »

Britain’s Broomstick Army

Britain’s Broomstick Army

By Michael Hull
As powerful, fast-moving German panzer and infantry columnsrampaged across Belgium, Holland, Luxembourg, and into northern France early in May 1940, the British held their breath and watched apprehensively from across the narrow English Channel.
The lightning “blitzkrieg” advance split the retreating French and British armies, and the outlook was   More »

Carlson’s Raid on Makin

Carlson’s Raid on Makin

By David H. Lippman
In the darkness, the two American submarines moved toward the hostile beach, inching carefully through badly marked waters. They surfaced well before dawn, and the Marine Raiders and submarine crews began bringing up rubber boats from below, inflating them on deck, installing outboard motors, and filling them   More »

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

By Michael D. Hull
Of all the workhorse weapons in the Allies’ World War II arsenal, from the American M-4 Sherman medium tank and jeep to the British Handley Page Halifax bomber and 25-pounder field gun, none was more widely and effectively deployed than the Douglas C-47 transport plane.
Dubbed the Skytrain by   More »

Combat in Normandy’s Hedgerows

Combat in Normandy’s Hedgerows

By Scott A. Bryan

Late in the evening on D-Day two German soldiers patrolled the outskirts of Colleville-sur-Mer, about one mile from Omaha Beach, and spotted Company C, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division resting in a hedgerow field. Standing on opposite corners, the enemy unleashed machine-gun fire and killed seven Americans.   More »

Death of the Tirpitz

Death of the Tirpitz

By Blaine Taylor
April 1, 1939, was a red-letter day in the history of the reborn German Kriegsmarine for two key reasons. First, Reich Chancellor Adolf Hitler presented the fleet’s chief, Erich Raeder, with an ornate, icon-studded Navy blue baton of office as the first grand admiral since the days of   More »

Bloodbath in Aachen

Bloodbath in Aachen

With weapons at the ready, the American squad advanced cautiously on both sides of the tree-lined boulevard toward the German strongpoint in Aachen. Buildings pummeled by Allied shells had toppled to the ground, sending concrete and bricks spilling into the street. Hardly a structure remained intact as a result of   More »



Issue Previews

World War 2 Casualties: The Freckleton Air Disaster

World War 2 Casualties: The Freckleton Air Disaster

As World War 2 casualties go, the Freckleton air disaster was the single largest suffered by the allies in the entire war.

The Likable, Inept Ambrose Burnside

The Likable, Inept Ambrose Burnside

Ambrose Burnside knew better than anyone ele that he was ill-suited to command an entire army into combat.

World War 2 Casualties & Caring for the Wounded

World War 2 Casualties & Caring for the Wounded

In the midst of escalating numbers of World War 2 casualties, American soldiers followed a medical care echelon system initially devised for European battlefields.

John Griffen’s Ordnance Rifle at the Battle of Gettysburg

John Griffen’s Ordnance Rifle at the Battle of Gettysburg

Inventor John Griffen’s 3-inch Ordnance Rifle was one of the safest, most reliable, and most accurate cannons of the American Civil War.

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