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Book Reviews, November 2018

Book Reviews, November 2018

By Christopher Miskimon
Special Forces Sergeant Nick Brokhausen awoke to the taste of dirt in his mouth and the crump of exploding mortar bombs. Above him there were voices but he could not tell who they were. Hands pulled him from the ground where he had been lying face down. Nick   More »

25 Missions Over Fortress Europe

25 Missions Over Fortress Europe

By Kevin M. Hymel
“Bombs away!”called out the bombardier of the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bomber Great Speckled Bird, signaling the release of a full bombload over an enemy target. He was wrong. Two stubborn bombs refused to fall, remaining in their bomb bay racks.
The bomber’s radioman, Technical Sergeant Thomas Fitzpatrick,   More »

The Last Days of the USS DeHaven

The Last Days of the USS DeHaven

By John J. Domagalski
General Alexander Patch had been thinking about moving some troops to the southwestern part of Guadalcanal since taking command of all American ground forces on the embattled island on December 9, 1942. Little more than a month later his soldiers were cautiously pushing the remaining Japanese troops   More »

The Race to Liberate Paris

The Race to Liberate Paris

By Ray Argyle
Flying a tortuous route from North Africa tothe French coast of Normandy via Casablanca and Gibraltar, an unarmed Lockheed Lodestar of the Free French Air Force broke through cloud cover over the English Channel on the morning of Sunday, August 20, 1944.
The plane carried Free French leader General   More »

World War II’s Quiet Marine

World War II’s Quiet Marine

By Nathan N. Prefer
He organized, trained, and commanded the 4th Marine Division in the Marshall Islands and Saipan campaigns before taking command of the Fifth Amphibious Corps and leading it against Tinian and Iwo Jima. He was on the short list for commandant of the Marine Corps after World War   More »

Braddock’s Defeat in the Wilderness

Braddock’s Defeat in the Wilderness

By David A. Norris
 Captain Daniel Lienard de Beaujeu rushed to save the remote French outpost of Fort Duquesne in early July 1755. Weeks away from receiving substantial reinforcements, the fort was the target of British Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock. With Braddock was the largest army in the North American frontier,   More »

WWI’s Daring Cavalry Charge

WWI’s Daring Cavalry Charge

By Alex Zakrzewski

In late 1917, the most successful cavalry charge of World War I took place not on the muddy killing fields of the Western Front, but at the foot of the Judean Hills in southern Palestine. The sun had just begun to set over the desert town of Beersheba   More »

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

By Sam McGowan
 Undoubtedly, the World War II aircraft type that attracts the most attention is the fighter plane. Yet, before the war, the U.S. Army Air Corps paid little attention to fighter development and tactics because its senior officers, with certain exceptions, would later lead the Army Air Forces with   More »

U.S. Army Failure at Anzio: Prudence or Paralysis?

U.S. Army Failure at Anzio: Prudence or Paralysis?

By Steve Ossad
Hitler called it an “abscess.” British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, the chief sponsor and loudest cheerleader for the endeavor, grudgingly proclaimed it “a disaster.” Lt. Gen. Mark Clark, commander of the U.S. Fifth Army, described it as a “strip of hell.” American GIs, their British brothers-in-arms, and their   More »

The GI Forum: Justice for Hispanic Veterans of WWII

The GI Forum: Justice for Hispanic Veterans of WWII

By Mike Shepherd
Hector Garcia was born in Llera, Tamaulipas, Mexico, on January 17,1914, to schoolteacher parents, Jose Garcia Garcia and Faustina Perez Garcia. The Mexican Revolution drove them from their homes in 1917 and his family legally immigrated to Mercedes, Texas.
Hector’s father, a teacher in Mexico, was not allowed to   More »



Issue Previews

World War 2 Casualties: The Freckleton Air Disaster

World War 2 Casualties: The Freckleton Air Disaster

As World War 2 casualties go, the Freckleton air disaster was the single largest suffered by the allies in the entire war.

The Likable, Inept Ambrose Burnside

The Likable, Inept Ambrose Burnside

Ambrose Burnside knew better than anyone ele that he was ill-suited to command an entire army into combat.

World War 2 Casualties & Caring for the Wounded

World War 2 Casualties & Caring for the Wounded

In the midst of escalating numbers of World War 2 casualties, American soldiers followed a medical care echelon system initially devised for European battlefields.

John Griffen’s Ordnance Rifle at the Battle of Gettysburg

John Griffen’s Ordnance Rifle at the Battle of Gettysburg

Inventor John Griffen’s 3-inch Ordnance Rifle was one of the safest, most reliable, and most accurate cannons of the American Civil War.

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