Battle of Pydna

Roman Empire

The Roman Empire, which at times included much of the known world, came into being following the five centuries of the Republican period in the history of Rome. The Roman Empire was founded in 27 B.C. and existed as a unified entity until approximately A.D. 480. During this period, the Roman Empire extended from the Middle East to the British Isles. The Roman Empire is remembered for its influence of language, law, military operations, and culture. The Roman Empire was ruled by a succession of emperors, and a 200-year period of peace that began with the reign of Caesar Augustus is known today as the “Pax Romana.”

Hannibal could probably have taken Rome itself immediately after the Battle of Cannae, so why didn't he?

Roman Empire

Hannibal, Rome and Cannae

by Keith Milton

It could be argued that Hannibal’s hesitation to go after Rome shortly after Cannae was because he lacked a siege train. Read more

The accomplishments of Hannibal were great, even in his own time, but the underestimation of the resiliency of his enemy proved to be his undoing.

Roman Empire

Hannibal of Carthage: Scourge of Rome

By Jonas L. Goldstein

The accomplishments of Hannibal from his departure from Spain, his crossing of the Alps, and his battles on the Italian peninsula, climaxing with his great victory at Cannae, were enough to permanently etch his name among the greatest military leaders of history. Read more

The Celts neither invented nor monopolized chariots, but they ably used these weapons of war through much of the 2nd Century BC.

Roman Empire

The War Chariots of the Celtic Elite

[text_ad]

by Andrew Scott

To the Latins they were Gauls; to the Greeks they were the keatoi (Keltoi), or Celts. A warrior people who at one time roamed Europe from Britain to the Black Sea, Celts reached the height of their power and cultural influence around the 2nd century BC. Read more

Roman Empire

Military Myths and Legends: Belisarius

by James Allan Evans

It was a sorry tale. A brilliant general, military hero, and faithful servant of the state, blind and reduced to penury in his old age, sitting on the main street of Constantinople begging for his living. Read more

The bicycle has long been a popular means of civilian transport, but in the Vietnam War, it was an important tool of war used by the Vietcong. More inside.

Roman Empire

Bicycle Infantry: Still a Tool of Modern Warfare?

by Peter Suicu

Ironically, two nations that used bikes in the greatest numbers have never actually used them in anger. These are the neutral nations of Sweden and Switzerland, each of which has rugged terrain and an independent spirit. Read more

Julius Caesar and his legionaries would find the fog-wracked island of Brittania both mysterious and fraught with danger.

Roman Empire

Julius Caesar’s Expedition to Brittania

by Ludwig Dyck

By the summer of 55 bc, 45-year-old Roman proconsul Gaius Julius Caesar was a veteran military campaigner. For the past three years, under his lead, the tramp of hobnailed sandals had resounded across the countryside of Gaul, the westernmost province of the Roman empire. Read more

While the British defense of Crete in May 1941 was considered a military failure, it altered Hitler’s future tactics.

Roman Empire

Beyond All Praise: British Defense of Crete

By Jon Diamond

Brigadier Eric Dorman-Smith, serving as a liaison to Lt. Gen. Richard O’Connor during Operation Compass, the Western Desert campaign, traveled to General Archibald Wavell’s Middle East Command headquarters in Cairo on February 12, 1941, to seek permission to advance British XIII Corps farther west to Tripoli after the total victory over the Italian Xth Army at Beda Fomm, which gave Britain and her Commonwealth Allies control of the Cyrenaican half of Libya. Read more