William Nolan, an American prisoner Of The Japanese, endured unspeakable hardships during the Bataan Death March and as a POW.

Japan

The Tokyo War Crimes Trials

by Roy Morris Jr.

When the Tokyo War Crimes Trials opened in the former hilltop headquarters of the Japanese military at Ichigaya on May 3, 1946, American-born chief prosecutor Joseph Keenan faced a difficult task. Read more

Japan

Fire Control at the Battle of Surigao Strait

by David Alan Johnson

One of the main reasons for the success of the battleships West Virginia, Tennessee, and California at Surigao Strait was their Mk 8 fire control radar, which was used in conjunction with the Mk 8 rangekeeper computer. Read more

In December 1944, a small radio code-breaking unit intercepted a message that should have tipped off the Allies to the Battle of the Bulge attack.

Japan

Codebreaking at the Battle of the Bulge

by Arnold Franco

World War II, being far more fluid than World War I, marked the advent of the mobile radio intercept unit whose task was to pick up, decrypt if possible, and pinpoint enemy units sending their messages through the airways. Read more

The Escort Carrier Gambier Bay fell to Naval gunfire during the ultimate sea battle of World War II.

Japan

Clash in the Sibuyan Sea: Gambier Bay

by Robert F. Dorr

When she went to the bottom of the sea at the height of the greatest naval battle in history, the USS Gambier Bay (CVE 73) became a legend for heroism and as the only U.S. Read more

General Ushijima's Support in Okinawa

Japan

General Ushijima’s Support in Okinawa

by John Wukovits

Lieutenant General Ushijima heavily depended upon two staff officers who, although differing in temperament, formed along with the general as effective a commanding trio as the Marines faced in the Pacific. Read more

The Siege of Osaka Castle, November 1614– January 1615 brought about a winter of discontent as Hideyori attempts to claim the invincible castle.

Japan

Siege of Osaka Castle

by Eric Niderost

In 1611 Tokugawa Ieyasu had every reason to be pleased with himself. His son Hidetada was Shogun, supreme warlord of Japan, but in truth it was Ieyasu who ruled the country behind the scenes. Read more