Military History

Military History

Finland: Germany’s Blind Alley

By Al Hemingway

Originally a part of Sweden, Finland was absorbed by Russia in the early 19th century. It was not until the late 1800s, when Russia began to impose new taxes on the Finns, draft their citizens into its military, and station troops within its borders, that Finland yearned for its freedom. Read more

Churchill joined in the charge of the 21st Lancers at the Battle of Omdurman in 1898.

Military History

Churchill’s Combat Experience

When a young British lieutenant named Winston Churchill charged into a swirling mob of Dervishes at Omdurman on the afternoon of September 2, 1898, it was not the first time the well-born cavalryman had faced combat in his nation’s far-flung wars. Read more

A tongue-in-cheek British cartoon from 1819 lampoons the idea of adapting the newly invented bicycle for military use.

Military History

Military Bicycles

By Peter Suciu

Anyone who has ever visited Europe—particularly France, Italy, and the Netherlands—knows that the people in those countries love their bicycles. Read more

Military History

Nazi SS Handar Division

Dear Editor:

As someone who has followed and written about the 1990’s war in Bosnia, my attention was drawn to the article entitled, “Himmler’s Recruits” (Insight, September 2010 issue). Read more

Having fatally shot King Alexander I of Yugoslavia, assassin Vlado Chernozem- ski is struck by a saber- wielding mounted policeman as he clings to the running board of the king’s car.

Military History

The Assassination Of King Alexander

By Blaine Taylor

Dreams of “Yugo Slavia” or South Slavia, began in the 1860s, and by World War I intellectuals in the region pined away for a Greater Serbia that would stretch east from the Black Sea to the Aegean, uniting all Serbs. Read more

Military History

La Chanson de Roland

The Song of Roland is an epic retelling of a supposed encounter between the Franks and the Muslim occupiers of Christian Spain. Read more

Military History

Lieutenant Creswell Garlington

Dear Editor:

I would like to commend you, your staff, and Mr. Frank Chadwick on the excellent article entitled “King Company at Bloody Lindern” in the June/July edition of WWII History. Read more

Military History

Who Killed Ambrose Bierce?

Besides his many proven crimes, Mexican guerrilla leader Pancho Villa was also accused in some circles of being responsible for one of the most celebrated disappearances in American history—the vanishing of controversial author-journalist Ambrose Bierce in December 1913. Read more

An African American soldier stands watch over a Union 12-pounder during the Civil War.

Military History

The 1st and 2nd Cavalry Regiments Before the Civil War

It is an irony of war that the model 1857 gun-howitzer that Union artillerists used to help turn the tide at Gettysburg was the brainchild of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, who championed the development of the new field piece while serving as secretary of war under Franklin Pierce. Read more

Military History

Teddy Roosevelt’s Nobel Prize

When most Americans think of Theodore Roosevelt, they conjure the image of the hard-charging Rough Rider at San Juan Hill, the western cowboy in six guns and chaps, the big game hunter in Africa, or the pulpit-pounding orator promising voters to “speak softly, but carry a big stick.” Read more

White Misery

Military History

The Art Of Keith Rocco

By Peter Harrington

One of the great tenets of 19th-century historical painting was the idea of plein air art, which called for “truth, naïveté, simplicity, and the impression of the moment,” and insisted that “the soul of the picture is the event, and that the various hats, buttons, bows, spurs, and straps of the costume are not the most important elements.” Read more