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The Second Pearl Harbor

The Second Pearl Harbor

By Gene E. Salecker
The first explosion came as a complete surprise to everyone around Pearl Harbor. The Sunday had started out clear and bright, but the sky quickly darkened as great clouds of thick black smoke rose high above the burning ships.
Fuel oil spilled atop the water and caught fire,   More »

WWI’s Daring Cavalry Charge

WWI’s Daring Cavalry Charge

By Alex Zakrzewski

In late 1917, the most successful cavalry charge of World War I took place not on the muddy killing fields of the Western Front, but at the foot of the Judean Hills in southern Palestine. The sun had just begun to set over the desert town of Beersheba   More »

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

By Michael D. Hull
Of all the workhorse weapons in the Allies’ World War II arsenal, from the American M-4 Sherman medium tank and jeep to the British Handley Page Halifax bomber and 25-pounder field gun, none was more widely and effectively deployed than the Douglas C-47 transport plane.
Dubbed the Skytrain by   More »

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

By Sam McGowan
 Undoubtedly, the World War II aircraft type that attracts the most attention is the fighter plane. Yet, before the war, the U.S. Army Air Corps paid little attention to fighter development and tactics because its senior officers, with certain exceptions, would later lead the Army Air Forces with   More »

Immortal Charge of the Light Brigade

Immortal Charge of the Light Brigade

By Christopher Miskimon
Six battalions of Russian infantry, 30 cannons, and a cavalry force deployed in the North Valley east of Sevastopol near the town of Balaclava. They occupied three sides of the valley, looking down on it. The other end was in the hands of the British Army. Spread across   More »

The defective Mark 14 torpedo

The defective Mark 14 torpedo

By Mark Carlson
Lieutenant Dan Daspit, captain of the U.S. submarine Tinosa could notbelieve his luck. Framed neatly in the periscope eyepiece was a sitting duck. The 19,250-ton Japanese tanker Tonan Maru No. 3 was all alone, dead in the water. Tinosa was on her second war patrol, having left Midway atoll on   More »

Combat in Normandy’s Hedgerows

Combat in Normandy’s Hedgerows

By Scott A. Bryan

Late in the evening on D-Day two German soldiers patrolled the outskirts of Colleville-sur-Mer, about one mile from Omaha Beach, and spotted Company C, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division resting in a hedgerow field. Standing on opposite corners, the enemy unleashed machine-gun fire and killed seven Americans.   More »

Bloodbath in Aachen

Bloodbath in Aachen

With weapons at the ready, the American squad advanced cautiously on both sides of the tree-lined boulevard toward the German strongpoint in Aachen. Buildings pummeled by Allied shells had toppled to the ground, sending concrete and bricks spilling into the street. Hardly a structure remained intact as a result of   More »

Pickett’s Charge: We Gained Nothing but Glory

Pickett’s Charge: We Gained Nothing but Glory

 

By Eric Niderost

July 3, 1863, dawned clear and bright, the warm sun promising even greater heat to come. By noon, temperatures were already in the low 90s, a typically hot and humid summer day in southern Pennsylvania. The action on the ground would soon get even hotter. Five days earlier,   More »



Issue Previews

The Nightmare Mission Into Laos: Operation Lam Son 719

The Nightmare Mission Into Laos: Operation Lam Son 719

During Operation Lam Son 719, the South Vietnamese raid into the Laotian panhandle, commanders learned first-hand how tenacious the North Vietnamese could be.

How Juan Pujol Garcia (a.k.a. “Garbo”) Made The D-Day Invasion Happen

How Juan Pujol Garcia (a.k.a. “Garbo”) Made The D-Day Invasion Happen

Double Agent Juan Pujol Garcia—a.k.a. ‘Garbo’—helped the Allies mislead the Germans as to the actual D-Day invasion landing site.

Union General John T. Croxton’s Southern Odyssey

Union General John T. Croxton’s Southern Odyssey

After being separated from Wilson’s corps, Union General John T. Croxton embarked on a 31-day odyssey spanning 653 miles, crossing four major rivers.

A Hard Mutt’s Life: “Military Dogs” in World War II

A Hard Mutt’s Life: “Military Dogs” in World War II

Below, the fox terrier ‘Salvo’ prepares for a drop over England. Military dogs played a key role in morale and companionship throughout the war.

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