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The Return of B-24 Hadley’s Harem

The Return of B-24 Hadley’s Harem

By Duane Schultz

First Lieutenant Gilbert B. Hadley—he liked to be called “Gib”—wasburied back home in Kansas in 1997, some 54 years after he was killed in action on August 1, 1943. “He looked like Clark Gable,” a Kansas City newspaper wrote about Gib when he was young. He “could talk   More »

Carlson’s Raid on Makin

Carlson’s Raid on Makin

By David H. Lippman
In the darkness, the two American submarines moved toward the hostile beach, inching carefully through badly marked waters. They surfaced well before dawn, and the Marine Raiders and submarine crews began bringing up rubber boats from below, inflating them on deck, installing outboard motors, and filling them   More »

Braddock’s Defeat in the Wilderness

Braddock’s Defeat in the Wilderness

By David A. Norris
 Captain Daniel Lienard de Beaujeu rushed to save the remote French outpost of Fort Duquesne in early July 1755. Weeks away from receiving substantial reinforcements, the fort was the target of British Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock. With Braddock was the largest army in the North American frontier,   More »

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

The Workhorse Gooney Bird

By Michael D. Hull
Of all the workhorse weapons in the Allies’ World War II arsenal, from the American M-4 Sherman medium tank and jeep to the British Handley Page Halifax bomber and 25-pounder field gun, none was more widely and effectively deployed than the Douglas C-47 transport plane.
Dubbed the Skytrain by   More »

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

Little Friends: Air Force Fighter Tactics

By Sam McGowan
 Undoubtedly, the World War II aircraft type that attracts the most attention is the fighter plane. Yet, before the war, the U.S. Army Air Corps paid little attention to fighter development and tactics because its senior officers, with certain exceptions, would later lead the Army Air Forces with   More »

U.S. Army Failure at Anzio: Prudence or Paralysis?

U.S. Army Failure at Anzio: Prudence or Paralysis?

By Steve Ossad
Hitler called it an “abscess.” British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, the chief sponsor and loudest cheerleader for the endeavor, grudgingly proclaimed it “a disaster.” Lt. Gen. Mark Clark, commander of the U.S. Fifth Army, described it as a “strip of hell.” American GIs, their British brothers-in-arms, and their   More »

The GI Forum: Justice for Hispanic Veterans of WWII

The GI Forum: Justice for Hispanic Veterans of WWII

By Mike Shepherd
Hector Garcia was born in Llera, Tamaulipas, Mexico, on January 17,1914, to schoolteacher parents, Jose Garcia Garcia and Faustina Perez Garcia. The Mexican Revolution drove them from their homes in 1917 and his family legally immigrated to Mercedes, Texas.
Hector’s father, a teacher in Mexico, was not allowed to   More »

82nd Airborne POW: Riding the German Rail

82nd Airborne POW: Riding the German Rail

By Richard A. Beranty
The large number of Allied prisoners being funneled south to Rennes, France, following the D-Day invasion swelled the German transit camp to capacity so the decision was made to transport the men to permanent locations inside Germany. They had been captured from all points of the Normandy   More »

Combat in Normandy’s Hedgerows

Combat in Normandy’s Hedgerows

By Scott A. Bryan

Late in the evening on D-Day two German soldiers patrolled the outskirts of Colleville-sur-Mer, about one mile from Omaha Beach, and spotted Company C, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division resting in a hedgerow field. Standing on opposite corners, the enemy unleashed machine-gun fire and killed seven Americans.   More »

World War II Special Forces

World War II Special Forces

By Michael E. Haskew
The concept of elite or “special” forces matured during World War II, and the term became synonymous with extraordinary heroism, particularly against long odds. The editors of WWII History magazine have put together a Special Issue, World War II Special Forces, entirely devoted to these units and   More »



Issue Previews

Swan Song for the CSS Shenandoah

Swan Song for the CSS Shenandoah

Built in Scotland in 1864, CSS Shenandoah was the last Confederate commerce destroyer to operate on the high seas.

Survival: The Story of the USS Franklin

Survival: The Story of the USS Franklin

Considered one of the greatest survival sagas of World War II, the story of the USS Franklin is almost too fantastic to believe.

Mark Twain Joins the Marion Rangers

Mark Twain Joins the Marion Rangers

After the Civil War ended his career as a river pilot, Sam Clemens joined the Marion Rangers, a new Confederate militia unit in Hannibal, Missouri.

Wunderwaffen: Hermann Göring & the Messerschmitt Me-262

Wunderwaffen: Hermann Göring & the Messerschmitt Me-262

Hermann Göring’s ‘Wunderwaffen,’ the Messerschmitt Me-262, was among several unveiled for the Führer that the Nazis hoped would turn the tide of war.

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