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Battlefield: Bad Company 2 – Breaking Down the Walls

Military Games

Battlefield: Bad Company 2 – Breaking Down the Walls

Bad Company 2’s fully destructive environments and adrenaline-fueled multiplayer helped keep EA in the war game arms race.

Bad Company 2’s fully destructive environments and adrenaline-fueled multiplayer helped keep EA in the war game arms race.

by Joseph Luster & James Hart

Five years ago, there was a blazing hot war taking place within the very feed of our television advertising spectrum. if you didn’t notice or, better yet, weren’t one to waste as much time as me watching TV, this was the head-to-head battle between two larger-than-life war game franchises.

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The belt may have belonged to Activision and their long-reigning Call of Duty series—pretty much everyone in the world officially played Modern Warfare 2 in some capacity—but we shouldn’t discount EA Games’ powerful contender in Battlefield: Bad Company 2. Though they both skirted very similar territory, Bad Company 2 had some tricks up its sleeve that made it unique, and ultimately worthy of addition to any shooter fan’s collection.

The original Bad Company, released on multiple platforms in 2008, established it as the more destructive side to the franchise, with environments mostly collapsable, adding a new element to taking out enemies along with your squad of crackshots. The real difference between this and the series proper, however, was the inclusion of a story mode to the single-player content. Rather than fighting bots on your own across the same maps as multiplayer mode (a la Battlefield 2), Bad Company was more akin to Call of Duty’s solo outings, with a great deal of emphasis placed on explosive scenarios and feverish shootouts.

Bad Company 2’s fully destructive environments and adrenaline-fueled multiplayer helped keep EA in the war game arms race.

Bad Company 2, in turn, brought with it the utter destructibility of everything on screen. It may seem kind of silly to hinge so much joy on being able to “blow stuff up good,” but it really did make a difference in the heat of battle.

And then there was the multiplayer. To put things simply, one could consider this to be the big brother to the the downloadable snack pack Battlefield 1943. Like that and others in the series, Bad Company 2 put you in one of two opposing squads, loaded with players from all over, ready to duke it out across a handful of modes that ranted from Capture the Flag-type stuff (Conquest) to a traditional Squad Deathmatch. Like many other games of its ilk, BC2’s multiplayer could at once be both an exercise in frustration and a rousing, fist-pumping tale of glory.

All in all, the game still comes highly recommended and rightfully so, even if it means putting down CoD from time to time.

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